Sharing economy gets boost with new ISO international committee

ISO has recently established a technical committee to support this new business model in reaching its full potential.

Standardization can reduce these woes and exploit the benefits that such a business model can bring, by providing internationally-agreed ways of working that take into account everyone’s need
In 2017 ISO stepped in, bringing together some of the world’s leading experts on the subject to develop high-level international guidance and a foundation for future standards in the form of IWA 27, Guiding principles and framework for the sharing economy.

A lot has changed in the sharing economy in the ten or so years since the likes of Airbnb and Uber were launched. Then, there were just a handful of platforms, now there are literally thousands, some doing better than others. A few are going bankrupt, while others are worth a fortune, such as Uber, which was recently valued at USD 120 billion).

The sharing economy was born, at least in part, with the spirit of creating communities and reducing over-consumption. While some of that remains, there has also been a sharp shift of focus towards price and convenience, bringing with it as many opportunities as challenges. Consumers may pay less and get new forms of goods, services or experiences, but questions are sometimes raised over privacy, reliability or trustworthiness. There are also issues related to working conditions, providing convenience for some, precarity for others. Some believe that issues such as these are preventing the sharing economy from reaching its full potential.)

Read entire post Sharing economy gets boost with new ISO international committee | Clare Naden | ISO.org
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Los Angeles targets 100% electric vehicles in the city by 2050

Last month, he introduced the city’s own version of the Green New Deal, which establishes goals of a zero carbon grid, zero carbon transportation, zero carbon buildings, zero waste, and zero wasted water by 2050.

Citing the environmental disasters the city has faced in recent years, the mayor explains in the 150-page plan that “the scale of our ambitions must meet the magnitude of this crisis.”

“With flames on our hillsides and floods in our streets, cities cannot wait another moment to confront the climate crisis with everything we’ve got”

“Politicians in Washington don’t have to look across the aisle in Congress to know what a Green New Deal is — they can look across the country, to Los Angeles,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti in a news release. “With flames on our hillsides and floods in our streets, cities cannot wait another moment to confront the climate crisis with everything we’ve got. L.A. is leading the charge, with a clear vision for protecting the environment and making our economy work for everyone.”

Read entire post Los Angeles Targets 100% Electric Vehicles In The City By 2050 | Liane Yvkoff | Forbes

Driving into a cleaner future

Perhaps an answer has come in the advent of “clean cars”. These can be defined as vehicles that are electrically propelled using either batteries or fuel cells that run on on-board hydrogen, and often a hybrid of the two. The idea of electrical cars has been mooted for years, but it is only now, with the proven effects of climate change, that enough is being done to make them a viable commercial prospect.

While only around 500 electric cars were registered per month during the first half of 2014, this has now risen to 5 000 per month during 2018)

Indeed, change is already upon us. Monthly figures published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders suggest that electric car sales in the United Kingdom have risen significantly over the past few years. While only around 500 electric cars were registered per month during the first half of 2014, this has now risen to an average of 5 000 per month during 2018).

Yet their production is not straightforward and many challenges face both producers and consumers before they can be considered mainstream. The first target, as Mr Yasuji Shibata, Toyota Motor Corporation’s General Manager of the Evaluation Department for Electrically Propelled Vehicles, makes clear, “is to develop the electrically propelled vehicle to the same level of performance and reliability as conventional vehicles within a reasonable budget”.

Read entire post Driving into a cleaner future | Robert Bartram | ISO.org

New digital tags for supply chain transparency

The packaging tag was been designed in a bid to improve transparency across the supply chain industry.

The ECO tag uses Radio Frequency Identification Technology (RFID) to digitally attach information to products.

The information will create a greater insight for employees and consumers to understand how products were made and transported.

Read entire article Stora Enso develops digital tags for supply chain transparency | Sophie Chapman | Supply Chain Digital

The genius of the London Tube map

Design legend Michael Bierut tells the story of the accidental success of one of the most famous maps in the world — the London Tube Map.

Small Thing Big Idea, a TED original series, celebrates the lasting genius of everyday objects so perfectly designed that they changed the world around them.

Japan firms fined $3.4M over train bidding corruption

The state-of-the-art maglev — magnetic levitation — trains are scheduled to begin commercial service between Tokyo and Nagoya in central Japan in 2027, later extending to the western hub of Osaka.

Gain a thorough understanding of the global anti-corruption best practices with ISO 37001 Anti-Bribery Management SystemThe giant project, estimated to cost nine trillion yen ($86 billion) in total, has seen a host of firms compete for contracts ranging from tunnelling work to building stations.

The Japan Fair Trade Commission brought charges against four companies in March for suspected anti-trust violations, accusing them of sharing estimated costs for construction work.

On Monday, the Tokyo district court ordered one of those companies, Obayashi, to pay 200 million yen ($1.77 million) and a second, Shimizu, to pay 180 million yen.

> Read entire article Japan firms fined $3.4M over train bidding corruption | AntiCorruption Digest

New (e-)takeoff for aviation industry

New technologies, from robotics to machine learning, are ushering in a period of rapid change and development. While the aviation industry is working to reap the benefits of this industrial automation, standards, especially those of ISO/TC 184/SC 4, will play a key role in ensuring a smooth flight path – but only if they can keep up.

Ever since Icarus boldly strapped on his wooden-framed wings made of feathers and wax and took to the skies, human beings have been defying gravity, designing and creating all kinds of contraptions and devices to get themselves airborne.

Finding solutions to these challenges calls for cost-­effective, fast and flexible new production processesHubris, along with solar power, did it in for Icarus, but these days, the likes of Elon Musk, founder and chief designer of SpaceX and creator of Tesla, and Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com and Blue Origin, are blazing new trails in the skies, driven by their vision and a sense of adventure, and propelled by the new technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

These modern-day Icaruses can afford to think big, and their successes, trailblazing endeavours and projections are splashed across the media. Of course, the aerospace and aviation industry has been pushing boundaries for years. From the first commercial air flight in 1914, demand for air travel has grown exponentially. As a result, the industry has had to seek new ways to design safer, faster, lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft.

> Read entire article New (e-)takeoff for aviation industry | Elizabeth Gasiorowski-Denis | ISO.org

Why you have (probably) already bought your last car

I’m guessing you are scoffing in disbelief at the very suggestion of this article, but bear with me.

A growing number of tech analysts are predicting that in less than 20 years we’ll all have stopped owning cars, and, what’s more, the internal combustion engine will have been consigned to the dustbin of history.

Yes, it’s a big claim and you are right to be sceptical, but the argument that a unique convergence of new technology is poised to revolutionise personal transportation is more persuasive than you might think.

The central idea is pretty simple: Self-driving electric vehicles organised into an Uber-style network will be able to offer such cheap transport that you’ll very quickly – we’re talking perhaps a decade – decide you don’t need a car any more.

> Read entire article Why you have (probably) already bought your last car | Justin Rowlatt | BBC

Cruising to safety: Improving man overboard detection with new international guidelines

Cruising never ceases to grow in popularity. Yet, what few like to consider is the small but real number of holidaymakers who fall overboard. New international guidelines from ISO aim to provide a boost to the technology that detects such incidents and helps them get back on board.

Posted on ISO.org | By Katie Bird

Over 27 million holidaymakers are expected to go on a cruising holiday this year), as the industry booms with more ships, destinations and themes riding the wave. The safety of these ships is rarely put into question, yet an average of 21 “man overboard” incidents occur every year), fueling an industry that develops detection systems to raise the alarm and locate the victim as soon as possible. Up until now, there have been no internationally agreed requirements to evaluate the effectiveness of such systems.

The new publicly available specification ISO/PAS 21195, Ships and marine technology – Systems for the detection of persons while going overboard from ships (Man overboard detection), provides internationally agreed technical specifications for systems designed to detect a person who has gone overboard from a passenger ship.

It covers how the system is expected to perform in a range of environmental conditions and incident profiles.

Cruising never ceases to grow in popularity. Yet, what few like to consider is the small but real number of holidaymakers who fall overboard.

Read entire article Cruising to safety: Improving man overboard detection with new international guidelines | ISO.org

How companies can embrace digital disruption

Traditional players in the logistics industry risk becoming irrelevant unless they embrace change in order to deliver more customer-centric services.

Posted on Supply Chain Digital

Supply Chain Digital examines the findings of a new report by Accenture, which offers businesses advice on how to upgrade digital logistics strategies, calling on companies to raise their game and prepare to disrupt

Newcomers primed by digital transformation are transforming traditional working relationships in the freight and logistics business. Leveraging big data and built-on cloud and connected platform technologies, they offer customers a seamless experience comparable with the consumer pathway: ease of access, clear pricing and near real-time integrated service.

Meanwhile, industry incumbents are stuck in a mostly manual ‘business as usual’ mode and risk loss of competitiveness and value from their operations.

Industry incumbents are stuck in a mostly manual ‘business as usual’ mode and risk loss of competitiveness and value from their operations.

Read entire article How companies can embrace digital disruption | Supply Chain Digital

Value of Cloud Supply Chain Management market set to hit $11bn by 2023

The value of the Cloud Supply Chain Management (SCM) market is projected to reach $11bn by 2023, according to new figures.

Surging adoption in transportation management has been one of the major drivers for the cloud SCM market, research published by P&S Market Research found.

As the world’s transportation networks and supply chains become increasingly intertwisted and complex, the systems that support them are advancing and improving at a rapid pace.

The systems that support them are advancing and improving at a rapid pace

Software vendors have been integrating more transportation optimization capabilities into their solutions, making it easier for shippers to streamline their supply chains, while also making them more cost- and time-efficient. This has been augmenting the growth of the cloud SCM market.

During the course of the analysis, P&S found that demand planning and forecasting is projected to witness the highest growth, with 20.3% CAGR during the forecast period, among all solutions in the cloud SCM market.

Demand management solutions help to predict and manage replenishment effectively, align price and profit margins, better leverage past product performance and maintain a leaner and more profitable supply chain.

In a statement, P&S said: “Demand management solutions takes supply chain management to the next level by enabling an automated ecosystem that simultaneously maps demand forecasting against factors like financial predictions, supply restrictions, inventory counts and customer commitments, as well as patterns of behaviour that can affect demand at any given time.

Moving goods with ISO standards

Moving goods between the point of origin and the point of consumption requires the collaboration and cooperation of many actors and even more machinery.

“Connecting ships, ports and people” is this year’s theme for World Maritime Day – celebrated on 28 September by the International Maritime Organization – which focuses on the many actors involved in shipping and logistics.

“Connecting ships, ports and people” is this year’s theme for World Maritime Day – celebrated on 28 September by the International Maritime Organization – which focuses on the many actors involved in shipping and logistics.

In 2015, world trade in goods was valued at about USD 16 trillion


Transport trends

An overview of recent trends and near-term prospects for the transport sector at a global level, as well as the long-term outlook for standards in the industry (maritime, air and land).


ISO standards contribute to the effective running of the shipping industry and you will find them at every stage of the supply chain. Take, for example, ISO technical committee ISO/TC 104, Freight containers, which provides specifications for almost every aspect relating to containers, from dimensions to handling and terminology.

ISO also has a dedicated committee for ships and marine technology. The work of ISO/TC 8 covers the different needs of the industry, from environmental management to supply chain security to smart shipping. In this way, ISO standards are at the forefront of creating innovations in logistics. The committee works closely with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to ensure that its standards respect and contribute to meeting IMO regulations.

ISO standards are also instrumental in helping to connect ports with rail hubs, air freights and land-based distribution, offering greater efficiency in how goods are moved. Because ISO standards are a powerful tool to ensure collaboration and efficiency across the supply chain, they make an important contribution to connecting ships, port and people.

To find out more, check out the latest issue of the ISOfocus magazine.