ISO and Food Safety

The consequences of unsafe food can be serious and ISO’s food safety management standards help organizations identify and control food safety hazards. As many of today’s food products repeatedly cross national boundaries, International Standards are needed to ensure the safety of the global food supply chain.

ISO 22000 specifies requirements for a food safety management system where an organization in the food chain needs to demonstrate its ability to control food safety hazards in order to ensure that food is safe at the time of human consumption.

It is applicable to all organizations, regardless of size, which are involved in any aspect of the food chain and want to implement systems that consistently provide safe products. The means of meeting any requirements of ISO 22000 can be accomplished through the use of internal and/or external resources.

ISO 22000 specifies requirements to enable an organization

  • to plan, implement, operate, maintain and update a food safety management system aimed at providing products that, according to their intended use, are safe for the consumer,
  • to demonstrate compliance with applicable statutory and regulatory food safety requirements,
  • to evaluate and assess customer requirements and demonstrate conformity with those mutually agreed customer requirements that relate to food safety, in order to enhance customer satisfaction,
  • to effectively communicate food safety issues to their suppliers, customers and relevant interested parties in the food chain,
  • to ensure that the organization conforms to its stated food safety policy,
  • to demonstrate such conformity to relevant interested parties, and
  • to seek certification or registration of its food safety management system by an external organization, or make a self-assessment or self-declaration of conformity to ISO 22000.

Find out more about ISO 22000 Food Safety Management System

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8 popular American foods that aren’t what you think they are

Food fraud is a $50 billion annual industry — and you’re probably eating some of the evidence.

From Kobe beef to Parmesan cheese, restaurants and grocery stores are packed with foods that aren’t quite what they seem. Food makers and retailers cutting corners and hiking up prices can result in feeding consumers some less-than-truthful marketing.

Now transparency is more important in the world of food than ever before. Consumers want to know what they’re eating — and they don’t respond well to being duped. Here are eight foods that might not be what you think they are.

1. Wasabi

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About 99% of all wasabi sold in the US is fake, reports The Washington Post. The vast majority of wasabi consumed in America is simply a mix of horseradish, hot mustard, and green dye.

True wasabi is difficult to grow and extraordinarily expensive, costing $160 a kilogram at wholesale prices. If you’re eating real wasabi, you’re consuming the stem of a plant, grated and pulverized into a spicy paste. It reportedly has a more complex taste, but needs to be eaten immediately — within 15 minutes, the freshly grated wasabi begins to lose its signature flavor.

2. Lobsters

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More than one-third of restaurants swap out lobster for more inexpensive substitutes in their dishes, reports Inside Edition. In February, the news organization ran DNA tests on lobster dishes from 28 restaurants across the country. Thirty-five percent of the samples contained cheaper seafood, such as whiting and langostino.

While langostino means “little lobster” in Spanish, the crustacean is more similar to a hermit crab — and less expensive than American lobsters.

Source: businessinsider

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