Community Resilience ISO

Sharing economy gets boost with new ISO international committee

It is one of the fastest-growing areas of the world economy, and it’s not slowing. Books, cars, flats and everything in between is up for sharing these days, and it's big business.

ISO has recently established a technical committee to support this new business model in reaching its full potential.

Standardization can reduce these woes and exploit the benefits that such a business model can bring, by providing internationally-agreed ways of working that take into account everyone’s need
In 2017 ISO stepped in, bringing together some of the world’s leading experts on the subject to develop high-level international guidance and a foundation for future standards in the form of IWA 27, Guiding principles and framework for the sharing economy.

A lot has changed in the sharing economy in the ten or so years since the likes of Airbnb and Uber were launched. Then, there were just a handful of platforms, now there are literally thousands, some doing better than others. A few are going bankrupt, while others are worth a fortune, such as Uber, which was recently valued at USD 120 billion).

The sharing economy was born, at least in part, with the spirit of creating communities and reducing over-consumption. While some of that remains, there has also been a sharp shift of focus towards price and convenience, bringing with it as many opportunities as challenges. Consumers may pay less and get new forms of goods, services or experiences, but questions are sometimes raised over privacy, reliability or trustworthiness. There are also issues related to working conditions, providing convenience for some, precarity for others. Some believe that issues such as these are preventing the sharing economy from reaching its full potential.)

Read entire post Sharing economy gets boost with new ISO international committee | Clare Naden | ISO.org
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