A Wisconsin company called “Three Square Market” will have employees (voluntary) receive RFID (microchip) implants that will allow them to access doors, vending machines and other facilities around the workplace. This may sound good on paper, but could have very dangerous consequences in the future if RFID implants become accepted and mandatory worldwide.

The rice grain-sized $300 (£230) chip will allow them to open doors, log in to computers and even purchase food. And so far, 50 employees have signed up for the chance to become half-human, half-walking credit card.

But far from being some sort of dystopian nightmare, Three Square Market’s Patrick McMullan believes everyone will soon be wanting their own microchip.

“The international market place is wide open and we believe that the future trajectory of total market share is going to be driven by whoever captures this arena first,” Mr McMullan said.

Three Square Market are even working with a Swedish company, BioHax, to deliver the new technology, which they see as one day being simply another payment and identification method – only instead of a credit card or phone, there would be a microchip between your thumb and finger.

But how did employees react?

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The microchip is like one you would find on a credit card.

While a large proportion of the world might think twice before putting a tiny chip in their hand, it seems those at Three Square Market had no such worries.

Out of 85 employees at the company’s head office, 50 have come forward, vice-president of international development Tony Danna told the BBC.

How does it go in – and how do you get it out?

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Tony Danna hopes that will eventually replace everything you might have in your wallet – from your key fob to your credit card and ID.

The entire point of the chip is convenience, Mr Danna explained. But the convenience also stretches to installing and removing the chip.

“It takes about two seconds to put it in and to take it out,” he told the BBC. Putting it in is “like getting a shot” using a syringe, while taking it out it like removing a splinter.

“Easy in, easy out,” Mr Danna said.

Source: BBC

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