A few weeks ago, I published an article entitled The Business of Continuity: why it’s not unusual to be loved by anyone and I described my love and passion for the subject. My everlasting love for it and why I’m not afraid to tell BC how much I care. I care enough, to tell the truth.

Whatever work you do, it is often referred to as ‘the game‘. You learn to ‘play the game’; and ‘be in the game’. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose and sometimes you draw.

When we are promoted to higher level or move into another career, you have to learn to ‘play on a different playing field’. ‘Play’ as in a reference, to ‘the game’.

Childs Play

Naturally we play games from an early age and it stimulates our development and thinking. Some games we are good at and some we are pretty pants at if we are honest. Of course, life is a very serious matter, (the level of seriousness you want to take it to, is totally is your call); and without question, our work is serious stuff too.

Semantics

Playing the game‘ sounds as though we are not committed but we very much committed. Everyone is; aren’t they? ‘The game’ is just a phrase to enable communication and often used to describe learning lessons in life and business.

Being on the game’ however… is another matter!

The Commitments

We are as committed to playing the work game as much as we want to be. Some see fantastic jobs as a vocation and some see them as just a job. It is about personal wants, needs and expectations; in addition to terms, conditions and rewards.

Leadership styles, organizational culture, finances, terms and conditions, employee relations et al, all play an equally significant factor in our own attitudes to the ‘game of work we play’. Across industries, there are games being played each and every day.

black and white dice reflected on black
Whatever work you do, it is often referred to as ‘the game’. You learn to ‘play the game’; and ‘be in the game’. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose and sometimes you draw..

A matter of life and death, espionage, campaigning, lobbying, project management and many more. Hustling and entrepreneurship. Whatever the issue and end target is, someone is ‘playing the game’ to get the right result they want or need.

It’s all a continuous cycle that has been played long before someone had the bright idea to call business resilience ‘Continuity Management’.

Some play to win at no cost and let’s be honest, some play dirty!

Many a tear has to fall, but it’s all, in the game’ (Nat King Cole once proclaimed)

Consistent Continuity Knowledge

The Game of Continuity is a strange game for some to understand let alone play.

Some wouldn’t even like the look of the box it comes in; whilst others just walk past and don’t see that it is for them.

Some will look, see the price tag and think ‘how much!!?’…

But the Business of Continuity and the Game of Continuity are actually, amazing fun! Strategy, tactics, operational elements and cooperative working. A resilient box of fun!

Now you might think I’m crazy, but I love them both and the chances are, if you are reading this article in The Resilience Post, you have a liking for ‘the game’ too.

It’s a subject that a great many everyday people, do not know exists and it’s a bit of ‘an exclusive club’ for some.

Membership fees and association members only in some parts; entry level subject to how big is your turnover and how much you want to spend on BCM?

The rules of engagement

There are plenty images of old boy’s network ties, pin stripe suits, corporate buffets serving wild salmon and canapés; back patting and distain for people who believe ‘the game’ can be played in a more modern way, for wider audiences to join in.

It reminds me a little of the five-day cricket matches versus the 20/20 version.

game
‘The game’ can be played in a more modern way, for wider audiences to join in

Some like both versions of the game; whilst others like the traditional long game format and some only want the 20/20 game, because of the excitement and the time they have available.

NB: Apologies to any reader not familiar with cricket but I hope it makes sense?

But there is room for both versions of ‘the game’ if we help it to develop.

We can encourage and educate new audiences and spectators to come along and watch and then hopefully coach and guide them to take part for themselves.

We are professional resilience practitioners, which means we are amazingly good at coaching, guiding and mentoring others to be more resilient. Some of the new players will not be able to afford the corporate expensive packages and most won’t need that anyway.

They just need a great view, great seats and the opportunity to ‘play resilience’ to the level they want and need. At the price, they can afford and in the time, they have available. How exciting does that sound?

We can all be winners in the Game of Continuity if we all have the opportunity to take part.

Some might believe it’s ‘Continuity or Bust’ but I believe 2017 ‘will be an amazing year’ of opportunity to open up the continuity box and amend the rules and playing pieces so it is more fair on equality and diversity for all businesses.

That is a ‘win, win’ situation!

“we are the champions…my friend. And we’ll keep on fighting, till the end”…


paul-kudrayAuthor: Paul Kudray, MSc FICPEM MEPS MAICP CBCI.

An international business resilience leader, Paul Kudray is a Fellow of the EPC and a Fellow of the Institute of Civil Protection and Emergency Management (FICPEM). He is a Lead Auditor for ISO 22301. In 2014 he founded his own consultancy and he is an excellent forward thinking resilience innovator and blogger. LinkedIn paul@kudrayconsulting.com.

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