How do you know that your bottle of champagne is the real McCoy? That your boots were really made in Italy or that your milk is indeed pasteurized? Traceability – known as chain of custody – is important for ensuring the authenticity, and therefore the quality and safety, of virtually every product imaginable. A new ISO committee has just been formed to make it easier.

From raw materials such as cotton to the T-shirt in your favorite shop, knowledge and tracking of the specific product characteristics (e.g. origin, sustainability traits and/or manufacturing process) is increasingly important and demanded by consumers. Traceability, and hence transparency, provides reassurance and a better understanding of production characteristics in order to reduce risks to health, safety and quality. In many cases, it is even a legal requirement. A reliable chain-of-custody (CoC) management system is therefore important for certification and quality assurance schemes.

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Traceability of products can only get better now that there is a new ISO project committee for Chain of Custody

The world is awash with CoC systems and programmes, all with their own semantics, presentation and industry focus, and include CoCs for food safety, sustainable agriculture or compliance in manufacturing. But the sheer number of such systems adds unnecessary layers of administration, thereby increasing costs and pushing smaller companies out of international markets. It is with this in mind that a new ISO project committee – ISO/PC 308, Chain of custody – was established, making traceability simpler for all supply chain actors by using a uniform ISO language globally.

Chair of ISO/PC 308 Rob Busink said: “The proliferation of traceability systems and definitions is causing unnecessary confusion, complexity and costs for players in different supply chains. The proposed generic chain-of-custody standard will define supply chain models and the respective traceability levels and specific requirements related to administration, conversion rates and physical handling activities, thus simplifying market access by using a uniform language and criteria throughout the supply chain.

Source: iso.org

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